June 25, 2017

Review Category : METRO

Publisher of The Guardian Alex Ibru Dies at 66

Alexander Uruemu Ibru, the publisher of Nigerian newspaper The Guardian died at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, the newspaper reported with great sadness. The newspaper article said Ibru, aged 66, died “in the course of an illness” — sadly, on the same day his wife, Maiden Ibru turned 62. Ibru, a former government minister, was a powerful critic of the kleptocratic rule of dictator Sani Abacha, the AP reported. Abacha’s regime banned the newspaper from publishing for a year, then masked men set fire to its offices when it resumed printing, the report stated. The publisher escaped death after gunmen shot ...

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As Nigeria Floods Rise, Canoes and Cholera Return – AP

IKORODU, Nigeria (AP) — Residents cook in knee-deep flood water and children wade past carrying roosters above their shoulders in this city on the outskirts of Lagos, where the rising tide poses a health risk by overwhelming sewage-filled outdoor toilets. In Ikorodu in southwestern Nigeria, wooden canoes sail in creeks newly formed over roads, forcing people to use gangplanks of scrap wood to stay out of the muddy current. And government assistance, despite Nigeria’s billions in oil money, is nowhere to be found. “The government just eats the money, keeps it to themselves,” said Joy Jolly, 36, balanced atop one ...

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Nigerians React to Muammar Gaddaffi’s Death

The demise of Libya’s strongman and former leader, Col. Muammar Gaddafi, inspired mixed reactions amongst the Nigerian people. Gaddafi who was captured, bloodied, pale and injured was dragged, cursed and spit upon by the same Libyan people he had oppressed, abused and subjected to a bloody war. World leaders and individuals from across various continents have reacted to the news. In Lagos, Nigerians gathered at a newspaper stand in Lagos, told International news agency, Reuters, their opinion on the fugitive leader’s bloody end. Peter Banjo, a church clerk in Lagos, said he believed Gaddafi had paid for his sins to ...

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Good Roads Coming to a Lagos Innercity Street Near You?

Good roads. We want them, and don’t have them. Many innercity roads in Lagos State are riddled with port-holes and the average Lagos driver has become adept in navigating. They cause accidents, terrible traffic jams, are damaging to vehicles, and incredibly hard on the city’s motorists and commuters. Governor Babatunde Fashola of Lagos has been working… very hard on paving and widening narrow and neglected streets, but the progress is slow and effects rarely seen on the mainland. Now, the state has plans to intensify progress on road development, especially in the innercity. Speaking with State House correspondents at Lagos ...

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What About Somalia?

During my work with the United Nations Association’s Interdependent, I worked on a video that takes a deeper look into the role of the United Nations in Somalia. As an intern with the organization, I have had the opportunity to speak with so many officials with the United Nations, the largest world organization. I can’t help but believe that the UN has taken to serving a much quieter role, especially when it comes to controversial, tough subject matters — Somalia, America’s war on terror, Israel, etc. I suppose the arguement could be that they are simply taking a diplomatic approach ...

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BBC Documentary – ‘Welcome to Lagos’

There’s the long-running anecdote that all Lagosians must have heard before. When one travels to other cities in Nigeria or anywhere else in the world really, there’s often a sign that reads “Welcome to (insert city name here).” However, should one ever travel to Lagos, there is no sign that welcomes you to the megacity, just one that reads “This is Lagos.” Take it or leave it. Get in or get out — no one really cares. Lagos is the concrete jungle. If one can make it there, they certainly could make it anywhere and BBC’s documentary, Welcome to Lagos, ...

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An Ambassador’s Take on Benin Republic

Very little is said about the Benin Republic, a country situated in West Africa, with a population of approximately 8.9 million people, about the same amount of inhabitants as New York City. The country, a former French Colony, became independent on 1 August 1960, and like every other African Nation, has had to fight to find it’s footing and its place in the world today. Like many African countries, Benin Republic endured a succession of military leaders. That came to an end with Mathieu Kérékou’s ascension to power in 1972 after Benin’s first major coup. ...

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